Why you shouldn't quit

Why You Shouldn’t Quit

If you suffer from a mental health condition you know how hopeless it feels. The deep dread that has hijacked your happy makes it seem like you’ll never rid yourself of the symptoms, the way it makes you think and the absolute lonely. It can be an all-consuming experience that comes with these unseen ailments.

Firstly, no matter how you are feeling, you’re not alone in your fight, sadly, far from it. Because we are limited to living in our own heads, we are subjected to its state at any given second in our lives. This creates our individualistic perception of self and as a result, we see the world from our point of view.
If you are locking horns with depression, anxiety, etc, then you know the battle is real and can feel like you’re the only one on the planet. But, are you? of course not. So then, what makes it feel like we are? I believe that your mental illness has infiltrated your mind and has exacerbated the feeling of loneliness by its very gifted talent; the art of negative self-talk. I know this mental health enemy very well and this has been my biggest battle.

Fight back, beat negative self-talk

Because the feelings of isolation tend to be intense, we end up ruminating on how alone we feel. This can make it difficult to move past this emotional intensity and find paths to reasserting our authentic selves as lord and master of our minds.

So, here’s why I think you shouldn’t quit. If you keep going and keep in mind that you’re truly not the only one in a constant state of mental pain, then I think you’re gonna have a better shot at reaching out to find like-minded people. Also, you may get to a place where you awaken to see your loved ones, friends and family as people who want to see you get better and are willing to support you, all the way.

Keep going until you find the support you need, I found a tremendous support system on twitter of all places. When I was at my lowest and loneliest point, those with mental health challenges reached out and as a result, I made some good friends and didn’t feel like I was battling PTSD and depression on my own… Maybe Twitter can help you too.

check out Thank You Mental Health Bloggers

if you are suffering from PTSD or another mental illness, please reach out. I thank you for your service and you are still worthy and mean something. I believe in you!


If you are struggling please go here: Crisis Services Canada


Want help fund my book? donate: GOFundMe – The Road To Mental Wellness – The book

You may also enjoy: Slowly Walking My Way To Mental Wellness.

Contact me on my Facebook page: facebook.com/TRTMW

Check out my friend’s blog here: anewdawnaa.com

 
Be brave enough

Be Brave Enough

As many of you may know, for over the last month I worked on a political campaign. Many of you may also know how the symptoms of PTSD started off lurking in the background than ever so slowly overtook me and by the end of the experience, my symptoms were so pronounced that I ended up spending less and less time in the office.

Read The Results Are In, Am I Healed?

As excited as I was at the prospect of having some semblance of a normal routine, next time, I have to be real with myself and understand that a new shot at normalcy isn’t a cure for mental illness. despite the end result, there are so many great reasons why I don’t regret being brave enough to put myself out there, to let myself be vulnerable.

Admittedly I probably took on way too much, I now know that I need to customize the next round that is more tailored towards my own needs, to work within my own tolerances. With that said, I also got so much out of the experience that it quashed any feelings of regret or failure. So, here’s why I Don’t regret being brave enough.

Tips on self-care

  1. I was fighting for change, for metal illness – The only way to make a difference is to get involved. Being a mental health advocate and a suffer myself, I alined myself to the New Democrats because mental health is a big part of their platform. Getting involved helped me advocate for us, asking the leader of the party a very important question. you can read about that here: Wait Times, A Mental Health Question For Jagmeet Singh or watch me ask it here
  2. I wasn’t only fully embraced by the team, I was trusted with a key part of the campaign which I am proud of that. The people I worked with under this assignment were amazing and so hard working, as was every person working towards our goals.
  3. The commonalities that we all shared was energizing, it felt like I was part of something bigger than myself, so full of hope.
  4. Finally, the individual friendships I have made as a result of putting myself out there was well worth the mental pain, they all made this part of my journey so much easier.

Coping with mental illness in the workplace 

Thanks
So, if you were to ask me if it was taking on this adventure was worth it, despite the mental distress it produced, I would have to answer with an unequivocal yes! Not only did I learn where I am mentally, but I was also given an opportunity to help the team, which I love. Not only that, but I had a sense that I could help make a real difference overall and as a bonus,  made some wonderful very caring and understanding friends along the way.
if you are suffering from PTSD or another mental illness, please reach out. I thank you for your service and you are still worthy and mean something. I believe in you!


If you are struggling please go here: Crisis Services Canada



Want help fund my book? donate: GOFundMe – The Road To Mental Wellness – The book

You may also enjoy: Spontaneous Mental Combustion


Contact me on my Facebook page: facebook.com/TRTMW


Check out my friend’s blog here: anewdawnaa.com

 

The Results Are In, Am I Healed?

As I entered the final week of the election, where I was a volunteer, I experienced a gradual decline in my mental health. In contrast, the week leading up to the election, I was feeling well, mentally and was well for the best part of two weeks. It was great to be freed from the feelings of threat, stress and near-constant anxiety. I never say it out loud but when I am feeling well I am always so hopeful that psychological tournament has been mysteriously extinguished.

I believe that being off work for as long as I have been energized me enough to try and get back into some sort of everyday routine and as a result, I was excited at the opportunity to test the waters; like a child on Christmas eve, I was so excited to see what a shot of normality would bring. After all, I was feeling better and felt like I had turned a corner. The Results Are In, Am I Healed?

Sadly, No, being out of the safety of my home where quiet and feelings of safety reign supreme, the exposure took a hammer and chisel to this happy reprieve from my minds struggles and by the end of it, my startle response was a constant seven or eight and the consequence of exposing my mental health to the onslaught of noise, sirens and constant busy have demonstrated to me that I am not where I had blissfully thought I was.

How to cope with the world when mentally ill

So, what does this experience teach me, teach you? Well, there’s more than one way to look at the experience and its outcome. I could feel defeated at the knowledge that the periods of mental wellness always fades like the sunset as it is overtaken by the night’s darkness, or I can acknowledge that I can’t always have sunshine and roses and understand, that when a period of post-traumatic stress and or depression blanket me in their symptoms, I have little choice but to ride the wave until I hit the shores of calm, happier points in time.

When in the throws of the heavy, exhausting feelings of mental illness, I must keep in mind that I will be granted tempory leave from my mind’s tournament. Perhaps most importantly, I have to be good with that, the way the cards have been dealt.

when I’m able to do that, I feel like I live a fuller, more manfully life because when I’m feeling well I don’t throw myself forward in time by saying, “This good time won’t last.” Instead, I live in the moment using mindfulness 

f you are suffering from PTSD or another mental illness, please reach out. I thank you for your service and you are still worthy and mean something. I believe in you!

If you are struggling please go here: Crisis Services Canada
Contact me on my Facebook page: facebook.com/TRTMW