Pain is pain, period.

Pain is pain period

As I go through my life, I have come to realize that pain is pain, period.

As a thinker, I spend a lot of time thinking about my long battle with mental illness. As a result, I have learned a lot about myself along the way.

With that said, sometimes I’d give anything not to think at all. After all ignorance can be bliss, right? However, good ole mother nature designed me to problem-solve. Oh, and if that weren’t enough, she added a dash of angst; you know, so I can obsessively ruminate over what ails me.

Thankfully, there is an upside to letting anxiety take the wheel. As a matter of fact, it has, oddly enough, helped me on my road to mental wellness. How? Well, let me explain.

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While it’s true that having a mental illness sucks, my generalized anxiety disorder has an upside. Yes, an upside. So, for example, I can come up with valid solutions, at least for me, around why, lets say, PTSD impacts my life.

For me, my fight, flight or freeze response is always on high alert. So much so, it’s like someone snapped off the leaver and quietly walk away. Damn PTSD.

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Together with anxiety’s power, I am in near constant, a lot of the time, low level fear. This is what could be considered normal for me, baseline if you will. Regardless, if pain is pain, then I will work at making it better.

woman looking at sunset
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com — Pain is pain, period

As much as I consider this “my normal,” I have come to the conclusion that being in a mental state that is literally always painful, is not normal at all. I mean, If I was in near constant physical pain, the last thing I would think is “this is business as usual for me.”

Like what you are reading? Try Robbed Me Of My Joy.

So, I have concluded that, while symptoms of PTSD are what they are, a reality I can’t escape; I deserve to, at very least, work towards accepting the constant discomfort as something I can work toward alleviating. After all, if I broke my arm, I wouldn’t whistle around town and try and muddle through; of course not.

In reality, pain is pain and in my view, pain not only happens for a reason, it deserves our full and immediate attention;If you’re hurting, please get help.

So, obsessively worrying about how I feel has made me think, think and think some more. Most importantly, my intellectual endeavours have made me realize that mental discomfort, is a normal response to mental illness, we should not mistake it for normality; rather, we should strive and grant ourselves permission to fight for inner peace.

While it’s unfortunate, that we may never experience a permanent sense of euphoria or inner calm, we can however, work on getting to a better place. We are after all, worthy of the opportunity to life our best life.

Checkout the book I helped to write:

Lemonade Stand: Vol. III 

Created by Josh Rivedal and Kathleen Myre, Lemonade Stand: Vol. III is a compilation of 20 stories from those who have served in the emergency services and the military.  In it, the authors talk about their battles with PTSD, a debilitating and for many, a life-long mental illness.  So, if you are from the military or emergency service’s, perhaps this book can help you combat the feelings of isolation and fear that frequently comes with post-traumatic stress disorder. Sometimes, just knowing that there are others out there, just like you, can provide you with the strength and courage to speak up and or get the help you need. The intention of this book is to help with that…. You’re not alone.

Also, Lemonade Stand: Vol III was written to help combat the stigma that often accompanies mental illness, best of all, it attempts to give all you served their countries and communities a voice… Which is amazing!

Pain is pain, period.
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If you are struggling please go here for help: Crisis Services Canada

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Checkout our Mental Health Resources Page

Contact me on my Facebook page: The Road To Mental Wellness

Peace and Stability

Stability and peace.

All we want in life is stability and peace, a goal worth fighting for.

Sometimes, I like to think of myself as a character in a video game. Why? Because I’ve had my life slide through to the realm of the unknown; only to be respawned to life once more.

Of course, this isn’t reality in its truest sense, I nonetheless, find it a good analogy for the ups and downs that is my adult life. I’m willing to guess that your life has periods of chaos?

So then, let me explain. Mental illness has been my unwanted travel companion for years. While this is certainly true of my adult life, I have a sneaky suspicion that the same is also true of my childhood.

What’s worse, is the impact this unwanted man in my mind has had on my overall well-being. Its done best to sabotage any attempts I have made to live a life of stability and peace.

Life anew, again.

Sadly, my life has had little peace. Between my interior struggles and the exterior world that fuel my traumatic experiences, my life has been respawn several times. Hence, the video game analogy. i have fallen, only to rise again.

From relationship failures to multiple leaves from work, including the last leave that has landed me where I am today, diagnosed with PTSD and living on workers’ compensation; I have seen many aspects of my life whither and die. Similarly, have also had multiple rebirth.

You may also enjoy Path to Mental Healing

While it would be inaccurate to blame it solely on my mental health conditions, it is, nonetheless, the principal villain in my story; responsible for the several reboots I have had to make. Because of it, I have had several disruptions to my stability and peace.

aerial photo of mountain surrounded by fog
Photo by icon0.com on Pexels.com

The Road To Mental Wellness is made possible in part by readers like you… thank you for your support.

On the positive side, my comebacks, while temporary have been triumphant. Filled with long periods of peace and stability. I keep making a comeback because of my unwavering philosophical approach. “Do whatever you have to get it done.”

Mental health healing requires action.

For instance when I took my initial stress leave from work, I transformed my lifestyle to better manage my anxiety disorder. I put down the chips and adopted a healthy eating lifestyle; I got off the couch and hit the pavement running. Doing what I had to do moved me from the land of dysfunction and back to the land of the living.

Whist I have stumbled and fell many more times in my life, I, like the main character in a video game, respawn into the game of life and just kept plugging away to beat the game; you can too… Just keep moving forward. You will eventually find your peace and stability.

Checkout the book I helped to write:

Lemonade Stand: Vol. III 

Created by Josh Rivedal and Kathleen Myre, Lemonade Stand: Vol. III is a compilation of 20 stories from those who have served in the emergency services and the military.  In it, the authors talk about their battles with PTSD, a debilitating and for many, a life-long mental illness.  So, if you are from the military or emergency service’s, perhaps this book can help you combat the feelings of isolation and fear that frequently comes with post-traumatic stress disorder. Sometimes, just knowing that there are others out there, just like you, can provide you with the strength and courage to speak up and or get the help you need. The intention of this book is to help with that…. You’re not alone.

Also, Lemonade Stand: Vol III was written to help combat the stigma that often accompanies mental illness, best of all, it attempts to give all you served their countries and communities a voice… Which is amazing!

Pre order today

If you are struggling please go here for help: Crisis Services Canada

OR

Checkout our Mental Health Resources Page

Contact me on my Facebook page: The Road To Mental Wellness

Anxiety?

GENERALIZED ANXIETY?

Is the constant stress you are feeling generalized anxiety?

Mental illness, sometimes it plays by its own rules; making you feel dreadful in a moment and inexplicably sad in the next. I don’t know about you but I think it’s fair to call it mother nature’s roller coaster. While it can feel this way at times, there are ways to combat its impact. Exercise being one of the best ones.

Anyone with a mental health condition can tell you all about certain emotional experiences, such as dread or fear but what about the impact mental illness has on us that we may be less aware of? Or even worse, no awareness what’s so ever?

So, what do I mean when I say less aware? Well, lets use my own life’s experience as an example. Rather disappointingly, I find myself almost chronically worried that I have done something to make people upset with me. This sad way to live isn’t new to me. However, relating it to mental illness is.

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Generalized anxiety disorder, a mental illness that makes one ruminate and worry over anything and everything is the likely culprit. Whist I have always known that GAD made me a worst-case scenario thinker, I never thought that it would make me obsess over making everyone around me upset. But honestly, when I think about it, it makes sense. It is after all, a form of obsessive worry which; obsessive worry can be driven by an anxiety disorder.

Why DO I suspect that it is part of my anxiety disorder?

To start with, it was the frequency in which I was feeling worried. Sadly, I was worried over each and ever interaction. No matter who it was or in what way we were interacting. From social media to meeting in person, the chronic feeling that somehow I was making someone upset with me was and still is overwhelming.

The Road To Mental Wellness is made possible in part by readers like you… thank you for your support.

If that weren’t enough, I would and still do, build an entire mythical future in my head as to why I “Thought” my friends and family were made at me. adding layers. “Maybe I message them too often, do I not talk to them enough?” My biggest fear? Well, that the person I’m communicating with doesn’t really like me and thus I am seen as a bother.

GENERALIZED ANXIETY?

As time went on, I began to notice that I became anxious interacting with, not one person, but everyone; the everyone part is key here becasue:

  1. It was everyone. Best friends, family, co-workers, firefighter colleagues etc.
  2. And it was constant. In fact, it was so prevalent that It began to scream at me like a giant electronic billboard. “NO ONE LIKES YOU, YOU’RE BOTHERING EVERYONE!”

Generalized anxiety was the culprit?

To reach an ultimate conclusion on the cause, I had to use mindfulness to bring myself into the here and now. By doing this, I was able to let the logic centres of my brain and ask the right questions:

  1. Is it really possible that everyone you interact with dislikes you? Similarly, can everyone you know view you as an inconvenience? Of course not.
  2. So, since it’s not very likely that no one wants to interact with you, what’s really going on? Does it this feeling lay within you?
  3. If, so, what’s going on?

Want to hear people tell their stories? Go to The Depression Files Podcast.

Since I had been diagnosed with GAD years ago, I rightfully concluded that I generalized anxiety was the culprit. With that said, having a diagnosis made it easier for me to conclude but you don’t have to be.

So, if you recognize similarities, perhaps what I have laid out here can help you uncover some underlying mental health condition you did know you had. Through the process of mindfulness, you can quell the emotions and negative self-talk and clear your mind so you can discern what’s really going on and move towards healing.

Note: If you think you may have a mental health disorder, contact your doctor, psychiatrist or a psychologist; they are all able to diagnose you and thereby help move you forward.

Checkout the book I helped to write:

Lemonade Stand: Vol. III 

Created by Josh Rivedal and Kathleen Myre, Lemonade Stand: Vol. III is a compilation of 20 stories from those who have served in the emergency services and the military.  In it, the authors talk about their battles with PTSD, a debilitating and for many, a life-long mental illness.  So, if you are from the military or emergency service’s, perhaps this book can help you combat the feelings of isolation and fear that frequently comes with post-traumatic stress disorder. Sometimes, just knowing that there are others out there, just like you, can provide you with the strength and courage to speak up and or get the help you need. The intention of this book is to help with that…. You’re not alone.

Also, Lemonade Stand: Vol III was written to help combat the stigma that often accompanies mental illness, best of all, it attempts to give all you served their countries and communities a voice… Which is amazing!

Pre order today

If you are struggling please go here for help: Crisis Services Canada

OR

Checkout our Mental Health Resources Page

Contact me on my Facebook page: The Road To Mental Wellness