Why I don’t advocate for men.

Why I don’t advocate for men, at least not exclusively. From my point of view, every person matters.

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In case you haven’t been able to tell by now, I have mental illness. And on top of that, I’m a man. While my gender reveal is far from a revelation, I am writing this post for a reason. So please bear with me.

Just the other day someone asked me, “Since you’re an author and mental-health influencer, why don’t you advocate for men more?”

While this isn’t the first time, I’ve been asked such a question, it remains an easy one to answer.

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In the case of the most recent iteration of this inquiry, I looked at him and responded with this: “Because I am interested in bridging the divide.” In other words, I continued, “I want to work with the totality of human suffering. Not just a piece of it.”

He looked at me with a surprised look and said, “Huh – now that makes sense.”

I am, so much as I am able, gender-neutral. And I try not to see color, religion, or cultural differences.

Nevertheless, what I do work hard on is making a person’s mental illness a priority. Notice I said “person” there?

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After all, a surprising number of people on this planet have had a mental illness sometime in their life. Many are still suffering now. Way too many.

Furthermore, just because I am a man, doesn’t mean I have to strictly fight on behalf of my mentally-ill brothers.

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In fact, I don’t favor any one group of people, period. For me, it’s all about the person you’re interacting with at any given time.

Whether I’m doing a talk for the LEAD project, a mental-health advocacy group in Nigeria, or here; I always afford the following to everyone:


  1. An ear that truly listens. Compassion – we ALL have periods in our lives that have been absolutely dreadful. and as such, we all deserve to be heard, validated, and safe.
  2. Those who live, worship, and celebrate life differently need to be respected. You’re there to listen, not judge. Furthermore, be upfront but kind when you need clarification.
  3. Support individuals with your actions and not with your own brand of personal solutions. In many cases, actions really do speak louder than words. But what does this look like? Well, offering them an ear is a good start. Also offer to help find them resources to help them. Be their mental-health personal assistant.

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Author Jonathan Arenburg bravely tells his story of his life-long struggles with PTSD, depression, and anxiety. Since childhood, Jonathan has found a way to not just survive, but to overcome…Join him as he tells his story, hoping to help you on your own Road To Mental Wellness Get a sneak peak of The book here Sneak Peek -The Road To Mental Wellness

So, now you know why I don’t advocate for men – at least not specifically. I want to use the mental-health community to serve as a unifier. And with it, help as many people as possible along the way.

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Categories: #thewellnesstalks, inspiration, Mental Health, Mental health advocate, Opinion piece, Road To Mental Wellness-the book

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