The need for neutrality

I have found that the need for neutrality when being online is the best approach for protecting one’s mental health.

Jonathan Arenburg
Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan is a mental health blogger, published author, and speaker. He has appeared in numerous newspapers and has been a guest on many podcasts.

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It’s no secret that social media is a modern wild-west of sorts. A fact that I think is sad, considering it held so much promise. Now, if you spend time clicking away on any one subject, you will see nothing but what you saw. So, if it goes against your values, it may cause elevated levels of anxiety. Copious amounts of this can trigger one to respond. Thus, increasing your angst. The way I see it, online social networks are mental illness creators. And for some? It makes their mental health condition worse.

In my case, it has become “all” things mental health. It’s a part of what I do to help others like me. While this has helped me reach others, I find that it – if left unchecked – can hinder my healing. How? Well, if I choose to dedicate too much time to the internet, all I see is mental health-related challenges. Getting caught in the whirlwind that these platforms call algorithms would only see me inundated with nothing but mental health – and it does.

Since taking on the role of mental health advocate, I had to set limits with these platforms. After all, if it impacts my progress, it defeats the purpose. Furthermore, how can I be a help to anyone if my already fragile health goes down the tubes?

Social media and mental health

The short answer? I couldn’t.

Despite knowing I must set limits online, I know that it hurts, to a large degree, what I am trying to achieve here as a mental-health blogger. Less time on the internet means fewer views on the blog and less engagement on the most-used internet media.

Front and back cover of the road to mental wellness - 8 sings your relationship is hurting your mental health.
Find out more below – Written for therapeutic release, published in hopes it helps you.

But – I’m okay with that. The Road To Mental Wellness was meant to inspire others. Thus, the number it helps is arbitrary in a sense. For me, if I have helped one person, the impact for their life is huge. For my own sake though, I need to strike a balance between what’s best for me and the help I am able to give.

Let’s face it, social media can be a downright nasty place. It’s full of trolls and people who feel empowered to be, say and do as they please. Have a point of view? Share it and see what happens. Regardless of what you’re into, the mean and nasty counter arguments are murder on mental health.

The need for neutrality

For us, the mentally ill, I think there is a need for neutrality. For instance, I do my best to accept the fact that: one, people have opposing views and two, those heartless individuals don’t know anything about me. Therefore, I take a neutral position. That is to say, that I choose not to respond. I clearly know my track record that is my life. As a result, nasty people don’t deserve a response. Why? Because they are wrong! Sometimes those who are wrong don’t deserve to be corrected.

I know that we are putting ourselves out there and trying to help others, but is it really worth your mental health to constantly have a go at your social media presence? Only you can decide, but if I had to guess, I would say that the algorithms of these addictive platforms are not good. Furthermore, the needless nastiness is a force that can wear down the most mentally robust people.


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“While it may be true that the internet can forget you the moment you take a break, it’s like all things – social media requires balance.”

Jonathan Arenburg – The Road To Mental Wellness.
If you are struggling, please go here for help: Reach out to Kids Help Phone

In the end, likes, follows, and shares are great in terms of reach, but I think it is more important to make your own mental health a priority. In my view, mental-health advocation is a long game. Like therapy, it takes time, balance, and self-care to go the distance.

Checkout our MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES PAGE

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Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan Arenburg is a mental health blogger, S speaker, writer, and published author; He is also the host of the mental wellness podcast, #thewellnesstalksHe has also appeared in the i'Mpossible's Lemonade Stand III. He has also been a contributing writer for Mental health talk, a column in his local paper. In addition, he has also written for the mental health advocacy organization; Sick Not Weak.Jonathan has also appeared on several mental health-related podcasts Including: A New Dawn, The Depression Files, Books and Authors, and Men Are Nuts. Since being put off work because of PTSD, Jonathan has dedicated his time to his mental wellness journey while helping others along the way.Educated as an addictions' counsellor, he has dedicated most of his professional life of eighteen years, working with those who have intellectual disabilities, behavioural challenges, and mental illness.He has also spent fifteen years in the volunteer fire service helping his community.His new book (2021), “The Road To Mental Wellness,” goes into detail about his life-long battle with depression, anxiety and more recently, PTSD. In it, he hopes to provide insight on how mental illness cultivates over a lifetime and, if not recognized and treated, how it impacts the entirety of one's life; right from childhood into the adult years. Jonathan lives with his two children in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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