Find your new upper limit

With so much going on in our world today, I find it’s easy to find myself thinking “The world has lost all of its compassion.” But is this really true? While it may be tempting to hold this belief, it is far from the truth. Sometimes all we need is to be reminded. Additionally, you need to Find your new upper limit

Whether you have PTSD, or another mental health condition, the world can be overwhelming, but it can be managed. Just find your new upper limit.

Jonathan Arenburg
Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan is a mental health blogger, published author, and speaker. He has appeared in numerous newspapers and has been a guest on many podcasts.

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“But John, how do we do this?” you might ask. Well, for me, it takes an abundance of people, coming out of the woodwork and proving me wrong. For example, I have been really struggling. Once again, I let my stubborn disposition get the better of me, and pushed myself, wayyy too far!

When one has PTSD, too much time wandering through busy cafes and loud streets can literally suck the mental energy out of a person. As much as I want to be exempt from the hypervigilance, startle response and aversion to noise, I am not!

How to manage PTSD when in public

I need to get better at saying “John, you can’t do it like you once did.” In the case of mental illness, the old saying “You can do anything you set your mind to,” doesn’t apply.

So then, what can you do? Firstly, learn to be okay with this; find your new upper limit. What does this mean? Well, if you find that you are starting to get overwhelmed by an environment, leave. And if you can’t? Ask them to turn down the music and find the quietest spot in the joint. Sometimes, all we can do is minimize the damage.

Front and back cover of the road to mental wellness - 8 sings your relationship is hurting your mental health.
Find out more below – Written for therapeutic release, published in hopes it helps you.


My advice to anyone who’s going through this right now, is to find your new upper limit by recognizing that the mental exhaustion is a precursor for a crash, so, rest….I feel like I’m near crisis when I am overwhelmed. Not always, but regardless, I know I need to extricate myself from society and head for the quiet and the peace.

Take it from me, it can help to save your life.

If you are struggling, please go here for help: Crisis Services Canada

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Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan Arenburg is a mental health blogger, S speaker, writer, and published author; He is also the host of the mental wellness podcast, #thewellnesstalksHe has also appeared in the i'Mpossible's Lemonade Stand III. He has also been a contributing writer for Mental health talk, a column in his local paper. In addition, he has also written for the mental health advocacy organization; Sick Not Weak.Jonathan has also appeared on several mental health-related podcasts Including: A New Dawn, The Depression Files, Books and Authors, and Men Are Nuts. Since being put off work because of PTSD, Jonathan has dedicated his time to his mental wellness journey while helping others along the way.Educated as an addictions' counsellor, he has dedicated most of his professional life of eighteen years, working with those who have intellectual disabilities, behavioural challenges, and mental illness.He has also spent fifteen years in the volunteer fire service helping his community.His new book (2021), “The Road To Mental Wellness,” goes into detail about his life-long battle with depression, anxiety and more recently, PTSD. In it, he hopes to provide insight on how mental illness cultivates over a lifetime and, if not recognized and treated, how it impacts the entirety of one's life; right from childhood into the adult years. Jonathan lives with his two children in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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