The new way to therapy

Jonathan Arenburg
Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan is a mental health blogger, published author, and speaker. He has appeared in numerous newspapers and has been a guest on many podcasts.

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Our lives have changed so much in such a short period of time, forcing us to be creative in almost every facet of our lives. However, some of these alterations I just can’t warm up to – and the new way to therapy is one of them.

The benefits of online therapy.

With that said, if I didn’t have access to my psychologist, I’m fairly certain that my PTSD would rule over me like a 15th-century king. I would have little chance of surviving this chaotic time.

The new way to therapy still has real value.

In fact, I can say with a great deal of certainty that I would not get through. But, thankfully, I am coping. Hey, it may not be ideal, but the new way to therapy – at least it’s something. So, I chose to be grateful For anything that will help see me through, I will be taking stock of all things that matter and indeed, those things that ease the burden.

On the other side of the coin, looking at someone on a computer screen just doesn’t feel authentic. Thus, I don’t feel like I am getting the most out of the sessions.

Despite this fact, I remind myself that we don’t always have control over our lives; as much as I wish this wasn’t the case, it is, so I do what I must.

In my life’s journey, I have learned that I must do whatever it takes to make things better.”

As we all should, this is not the time to out-and-out reject the help we get or have access to. It’s a time to grin and bear it, do the best we can and pick up the pieces when this worldwide health emergency ends…and it will end.

Front and back cover of the road to mental wellness - 8 sings your relationship is hurting your mental health.
Find out more below – Written for therapeutic release, published in hopes it helps you.

I am not at all surprised to hear that others are finding certain things less helpful for them now than before. Almost daily we hear of another tragic aspect to COVID -19 and, well, quite frankly, personally it’s getting more and more difficult to combat my depression. I assume you are feeling it too.

NEED ADDITIONAL SUPPORT? VISIT OUR MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES PAGE HERE.

How then, do we ever expect to get out of this and ever expect to recover? I think the answer is that we may not make a full recovery. By that, I mean the world we once knew will be a world we leave behind. In the interim, we have to use whatever is at our disposal to help us navigate through the unimaginable. Sometimes, getting through this will be a moment-by-moment thing. However, we will get through it.

Just don’t give up: a window can become a door; a simple coffee can bring a sense of normality and a video connection with a mental-health professional can pull you into the light. In other words, the new way to therapy still has real value.

COVID-19 and your mental health

In crisis? Call 1.833.456.4566 | Text 45645 (Crisis Services Canada) Crisis Services Canada

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Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan Arenburg is a mental health blogger, S speaker, writer, and published author; He is also the host of the mental wellness podcast, #thewellnesstalksHe has also appeared in the i'Mpossible's Lemonade Stand III. He has also been a contributing writer for Mental health talk, a column in his local paper. In addition, he has also written for the mental health advocacy organization; Sick Not Weak.Jonathan has also appeared on several mental health-related podcasts Including: A New Dawn, The Depression Files, Books and Authors, and Men Are Nuts. Since being put off work because of PTSD, Jonathan has dedicated his time to his mental wellness journey while helping others along the way.Educated as an addictions' counsellor, he has dedicated most of his professional life of eighteen years, working with those who have intellectual disabilities, behavioural challenges, and mental illness.He has also spent fifteen years in the volunteer fire service helping his community.His new book (2021), “The Road To Mental Wellness,” goes into detail about his life-long battle with depression, anxiety and more recently, PTSD. In it, he hopes to provide insight on how mental illness cultivates over a lifetime and, if not recognized and treated, how it impacts the entirety of one's life; right from childhood into the adult years. Jonathan lives with his two children in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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