Those Ironic Moments

Our lives are full of those ironic moments. Some funny, while others not so much.

Our lives are full of those ironic moments. Some funny, while others not so much. One aspect of my life that is full of irony is my never-ending battle with PTSD and depression – two of the three mental illnesses that wreak the most havoc.

I have made it my mission to fight like hell for my health, with the primary goal being to live the best life with those I love. Admittedly, this process can have some ironic consequences.

Take this constant medication thing. I have had little success in administering any of them. It’s s quite something to put yourself through, over and over, hoping for fewer side effects and more effectiveness.

Want to read more? check out: Path To Mental Healing

Sadly, this has not been my experience. As a matter of fact, the only help they have given me is a euphoric period when I first start a new regime. During the breaking-in period, if you will – I feel great!

But, ironically, this great feeling is not real, and while it seems like it’s working, it’s merely my neurochemistry and the med getting acquainted. So far, that’s the only relief from the mental pain I have experienced.

Unfortunately, once they get to know one another, the feeling of freedom dwindles. As a consequence, my brain becomes complacent and the mental illness creeps in.

Want to hear about others’ mental health journeys? Go to A New Dawn Podcast

Front and back cover of the road to mental wellness - 8 sings your relationship is hurting your mental health.
Find out more below – Written for therapeutic release, published in hopes it helps you.

What the ultimate form of irony is, is that the very act of trying new meds, and to create a better life with family, requires a temporary retreat. The euphoria I spoke of earlier also comes with a feeling of sedation. This manufactured exhaustion takes me out, puts me down, and I miss a lot.

I am attempting to work off the theory of short-term pain for long-term gain, but I have to say, it just seems long. Moreover, with this up-and-down motion – from feeling good to severe depression and PTSD symptoms – it’s more of a torture than an improvement. It’s like being in two different states of reality.

However, I remain undeterred and still up for the fight. My motivation for a mentally-healthy mind will never be quelled. My loved ones are the guiding light through it all, the brain fog, the flashbacks and long sleepless nights. I know that one day, I will be able to hold my head up high with pride, knowing that I beat mental illness back to the degree that it can no longer rob me of time with my family. At the end of the day, it will be worth all those ironic moments.

Jonathan Arenburg

Jonathan Arenburg is a mental health blogger, S speaker, writer, and published author; He is also the host of the mental wellness podcast, #thewellnesstalksHe has also appeared in the i'Mpossible's Lemonade Stand III. He has also been a contributing writer for Mental health talk, a column in his local paper. In addition, he has also written for the mental health advocacy organization; Sick Not Weak.Jonathan has also appeared on several mental health-related podcasts Including: A New Dawn, The Depression Files, Books and Authors, and Men Are Nuts. Since being put off work because of PTSD, Jonathan has dedicated his time to his mental wellness journey while helping others along the way.Educated as an addictions' counsellor, he has dedicated most of his professional life of eighteen years, working with those who have intellectual disabilities, behavioural challenges, and mental illness.He has also spent fifteen years in the volunteer fire service helping his community.His new book (2021), “The Road To Mental Wellness,” goes into detail about his life-long battle with depression, anxiety and more recently, PTSD. In it, he hopes to provide insight on how mental illness cultivates over a lifetime and, if not recognized and treated, how it impacts the entirety of one's life; right from childhood into the adult years. Jonathan lives with his two children in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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